Does an Interview Scare You?

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DoesanInterviewScareYouDo not let the interview send you into shock. Follow these tips to help calm your fears.

Your heart is beating faster than usual, your hands feel clammy, your mouth is so dry it feels like you have cotton inside — and you’re supposed to feel confident. Are you going to an interview or a torture session? The answer is –”it’s all in your perspective.”

Ideally you would sit poised thumbing through a magazine, feeling relaxed as you wait your turn to have a conversation with the interviewer for the company. Think about it — what do you have to lose here? What’s the worst thing that can happen? What if you don’t get this job — is the world going to stop turning? I realize of course, that bills must be paid, but you are taking the wrong approach if you are going to come across as desperate — “Please, please, hire me.” Interviewers smell fear.

A change in thinking

The first, and most important step is to change the way that you view

How to Use Facebook to Land a Job

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2193213362_b5d556491eIt isn’t just the volume of users that makes Facebook an attractive source of hiring and research – it’s also the fact that 70 percent of Facebook users engage daily, versus only 13 percent of LinkedIn users, according to a 2015 Pew Research study. While many job seekers consider LinkedIn to be the professional network and place to be, it isn’t the only social network recruiters will look at. According to Jobvite’s 2014 Social Recruiting Survey, 66 percent of recruiters reported using Facebook to recrtuit.

Conduct an audit. Head over to Google or your favorite search engine and search for your name. Take note of what appears on the first page of search results. Chances are, you will see a listing that says “[Your name] Profiles | Facebook.” Click on this link, and you will see the Facebook profiles of people with your name.

Next, look at your status updates. Do your posts have a globe next to the date? If so, your update is public, which means anyone and everyone can see your update and comments others have added.

Going to a Job Fair? Here Are Some Tips

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GoingtoanInsuranceJobFairHereAreSomeTipsThere is lots of competition at a job fair. Be should to put on your best performance to increase your odds.

There is more competition in the job market than there was a few years ago, so it pays to get out there. Attending a job fair beats sitting at home waiting for the phone to ring. If nothing else, it’s a place to schmooze and find out what’s happening. Your approach to the fair may make a huge difference in whether you achieve satisfactory results.

Joe received his layoff notice on a Friday. After a week at home, he knew he had to get out and make some contacts. He found and landed his last job at a job fair, and soon discovered on the Internet there was a tech fair in his area the following week.

Armed with several copies of his resume, Joe set out with an air of confidence. His confidence got a blow when he arrived at the site and saw the long line of people waiting to get in.

10 Ways Social Media Can Help You Land a Job

Improve your chances of being the selected job candidate by using social media.

Companies are checking you out online, so why not use social media to enhance your qualifications? A 2015 CareerBuilder survey of more than 2,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals revealed that 52 percent of employers use social networking sites to research job candidates. In fact, about one-third of those employers have found content that made them more likely to hire a candidate. Here’s how to build a positive, professional online presence to help you stand out.

Show your personality.

Almost 40 percent of those surveyed said that a candidate’s personality on social media seemed like a good fit with company culture. How often have you thought: “If only I could get in front of someone and prove I am a good fit?” With social media, you can inject your style in status updates and even your LinkedIn summary. Sure, your skills and experience qualify you for jobs, but your personality is one more way to seal the deal.

Be who you say you are.​

When employers see how your background information supports your qualifications for the job, you look like the real deal. Forty-two percent of employers

How to leverage your smartphone for the job search

Have you noticed how just about everything in our world has gone mobile? You can deposit your checks without going to the bank, chat face-to-face with loved ones far away, and read books and magazines on-the-go without harming a single tree. Even the most brick-and-mortar businesses have developed mobile websites (and perhaps an app or two) to compete in today’s market.

As job seekers, it’s important to embrace the mobile job search or get lost among the competition. Here are five tips to make the most of your smartphone for the job search.

Search and vet job listings

If you’re using a website to search for job listings, download its accompanying app so you can access and vet job postings on-the-go. For instance, TheLadders’ app, “Ladders by TheLadders,” allows job seekers to identify job matches on-the-go, discover new job opportunities and retrieve information on your competition. Instead of searching by keyword, this app delivers tailored matches based on your profile, experience and career goals. The listings refresh every time you open the app, ensuring you’re looking at the newest job posts.

Beat the 72-hour window

A recent study by TheLadders found that the

How Successful People Beat Stress

If it feels like everything is more stressful these days, that’s because it is. Recent research by the University of Cambridge has shown that more than a third of people feel overwhelmed by technology today, including 34 percent of tech-savvy millennials.

A separate study, conducted by Nielsen, found that 80 percent of American workers feel major stress in the office. A few reasons employees cited for feeling stressed out included long commutes, low pay, unreasonable workload, problematic co-workers and limited work-life balance.But there’s no need to suffer in silence. Keep chaos at bay by practicing these proven solutions to boost your energy, ratchet down your stress level and help you become a top performer:

Decide if you want more or less of certain activities. Stress drains energy, leaving you low on mojo to achieve important tasks and reach goals. To regain your center when knocked off balance by daily stressors, thinking about how you are spending your time can help. In their book “Find Your Balance Point,” authors Brian Tracy and Christina Stein suggest that you can

How to Keep Your Spirits Up During Your Job Search

If you’ve been in a job search for more than a few weeks you may be experiencing the feelings of defeat and despair, not to mention the urge to give up. It’s been a tough year, and then some, for those who have lost jobs for whatever reason. Interviewing with no second interviews or offers coming in begins to wear thin – very fast.

Here are some tips to keep your spirits up when you’re feeling down during this process.

1. Don’t give up.

You may have heard some of these stories before but they remain inspirational.

* Thomas Edison patented 1,093 inventions in his lifetime, but it took him 10,000 attempts to make an electric light bulb work.

* Walt Disney’s Mickey Mouse series failed to become an instant hit, but he kept trying and in 1928 he added sound and made it an electrifying success.

* Milton Hershey failed several businesses before he became the “Chocolate King” and built Hershey town. He even went bankrupt in his first business venture.

(Source “Milana Leshinsky” – http://www.accpow.com.)

These are great “successes-after-failure stories” that couldn’t have happened if these people

How to Overcome Job-Search Misery

Say you’re a boxer who’s been taking some serious beatings lately. You show up to each match still swollen and sore from the last. You feel slow and scared and start expecting to get your butt kicked. The more pressure you feel to win just one stupid match, the more bummed you get when you don’t. And you start thinking maybe you should just give up the whole cruel sport.

The job hunt is pretty brutal, too.

A long, arduous search can leave psychological bruises and hurl you into a self-defeating cycle. “It’s a blow to your self-esteem,” says David Reiss, a psychiatrist based in San Diego. The more confidence you lose, the worse you perform in the job search. This process “takes a half a step off your game,” Reiss says.

1. Have fun. Do you remember this concept of fun [pronounced: fuhn]? You’re still allowed to have some, even if your job search has been unsuccessful. Think about what makes you happy, and do it. “What do you usually do for fun, and what have you given up?” Reiss asks. If money’s tight, find cheaper variations of those activities, he adds. Say you

Seven Tips to Leverage Long-Term Employment on Your Resume

We get a lot of questions on the Resume Tips Forum from job seekers asking how to handle job-hopping and long periods of unemployment on their resumes. But occasionally, someone asks the flip side: how to handle long-term employment with one company. With so much disruption in the labor force and many workers eager to jump at better jobs, employees who stay with one company for a significant amount of time may wonder, “Am I a dinosaur?”

The answer, of course, is no. The key is to present your long-term work history as a positive attribute, proof you’re in for the long haul. Recruiting a new employee is an expensive endeavor — companies are always looking for ways to promote long-term tenure — so demonstrate you are a worthwhile investment. If you would like to use your solid work history as a selling point, here are seven ways to enhance your resume:

1. Keep Learning

Some employers might view your long-term employment as an indication that your skills have stagnated. Prove them wrong by constantly refreshing your skills through formal education and self-study. Participate in professional-development courses sponsored by your employer or paid for out-of-pocket. Create a Professional Development section

Mobilize your professional resume

Invest in a professional resume that will make it past any gatekeeper and outsmart applicant tracking software.

This week I want you to focus on one of the core marketing materials you’ll use during the job search – your resume.

When was the last time you printed out a job application and mailed it to an employer? While it’s not unheard of, it’s certainly not the norm these days. And chances are, you surf the web rather than open a newspaper when you want to find job listings.

Since job boards emerged in the late 90s, the way we search for and apply to jobs has radically changed. With just a few key strokes you have access to thousands of job posts from all over the world. Unfortunately, this also means you’re competing within a much larger, less-qualified pool of candidates. Your resume needs to not only speak to the recruiter and hiring manager; it must first make it past an electronic gatekeeper known as an applicant tracking system (ATS).

Below are five tips to help you craft a professional resume that will make it through the gatekeepers